English 430: Literature & the Visual Arts

430 textbooks

Following are our textbooks for 430, listed in likely order of use. Each image below links to a page on amazon.com featuring the book in question (just click on the book cover to follow the link).

The books at the top of the list are Required; the books at the bottom are Recommended only. The Matador Bookstore has ordered all of these books, and I’ll be announcing in class as the books become available there. Of course you can also order from other sources, including amazon, half.com, or, best of all, your local independent bookstore.

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Required

1.

Oviatt Library banner

English 430 Reader, on Electronic Reserve at the Oviatt Library. This is a PDF reader custom-made for our course, accessible online via the Oviatt’s website. To access this reader, go to the library homepage and click on Course Reserves, or use the link above. For convenience’s sake, this reader is “bookmarked” to separate the various selections: just click on the bookmark icon that will appear on the lefthand side. As of this writing (8/26/09) the content of the reader is slightly out of date; some new selections will soon be added and one or two old selections will be phased out.

Please remember that you can and should print out hard copies of the reader selections to use in the classroom when we are scheduled to discuss them; we will often be referring to specific passages from the readings in class. (Bear in mind that the computer labs at the University Student Union and Satellite Student Union offer 20 pages of free printing per student per day.)

2.

The New York Trilogy by Paul Auster, including City of Glass.

The New York Trilogy (1987) by Paul Auster, a trio of postmodern detective novellas including City of Glass (first published in 1985). Our preferred edition is the 2006 Penguin, shown above.

3.

City of Glass: The Graphic Novel, by Paul Karasik and David Mazzucchelli, based on the novel by Paul Auster.

City of Glass, the graphic novel, by Paul Karasik and David Mazzucchelli, based on the novella by Paul Auster. Originally published by Avon (1994), this became a cult classic and has since been reprinted by Picador (2004), our preferred edition.

4.

Songs of Innocence and of Experience, by William Blake (Oxford UP facsimile edition)

Songs of Innocence and of Experience, a handmade book of illuminated verse by William Blake, originally created in 1789-1794. Blake is a one-of-a-kind genius of art and verse, and one of the great, uncategorizable eccentrics in English literature. Our preferred edition is Keynes' Oxford UP facsimile, above.

5.

Where the Wild Things Are, by Maurice Sendak.

Where the Wild Things Are, by Maurice Sendak (1963). One of the most influential and widely-imitated picture books ever, it has been continuously in print for over 45 years. By an avid Blake collector!

6.

Vertigo: A Novel in Woodcuts, by Lynd Ward

Vertigo: A Novel in Woodcuts, a classic of wordless visual storytelling by Lynd Ward, one of the forerunners of the graphic novel. First published in 1937, this remained out of print for generations but has at last (2009) been republished, thanks to Dover and scholar David A. Beronä, a Ward expert.

7.

What It Is, by Lynda Barry

What It Is, by Lynda Barry (2008). Beyond category: part comics, part scrapbook, part how-to book, part autobiography, part meditation. Barry has been a prolific cartoonist and writer (novelist, playwright, etc.) since the 1980s.

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Recommended

A.

Words about Pictures: The Narrative Art of Children's Picture Books, by Perry Nodelman.

Words about Pictures: The Narrative Art of Children's Picture Books, by Perry Nodelman (1988). A pioneering work of scholarship.

B.

The Century of Artists' Books, by Johanna Drucker.

The Century of Artists' Books, by Johanna Drucker (1995; revised edition 2004). Another pioneering work. Drucker is a book artist as well as scholar.

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